Uganda: Educated in Adjumani
18 December 2008

Working towards girls' education is one of JRS's principles. (Angelika Mendes/JRS)
I spent one whole year in Dungu refugee camp, but was unable to continue school as the education system in Zaire was in French.
Adjumani, 18 December 2008 – I was born in the Eastern Equatoria State in Southern Sudan. In 1984, when I was 11 years old, I started my primary education in Anzara. When the civil war between north and southern Sudan intensified and reached Anzara area in 1991, I was forced to leave with my family.

We headed towards Zaire (now Congo) for exile. I spent one whole year in Dungu refugee camp, but was unable to continue school as the education system in Zaire was in French. 

Early in 1992, we moved to Uganda seeking refuge in the Adjumani refugee settlements. I managed to continue my education in Robidire. 

Pursuing higher education

Until I finished primary school, JRS gave me school materials and payed my tuition fees. With a sponsorship of the UN refugee agency (UNHCR) I started secondary education and passed O-Levels in 1998. 

Since I could not proceed for higher learning I started teaching as a voluntary teacher for commerce at Robidire refugee camp. 

In 2001 I got a scholarship from JRS and was sent for teacher training at the National Teachers College in Gulu. JRS supported me by paying my school fees, school practice money and pocket money. 

Helping more girls get access to  education

Two years later, after a full time study in college, I acquired a Diploma in Secondary Education. As a fully trained commerce teacher I was reemployed at the school where I had been teaching before. 

Not much later I was chosen to be the senior woman teacher who is responsible for leading, guiding and counselling the girl students and for carrying out workshops and conferences in coordination with JRS's affirmative action education team. 

I facilitated the tuition fee for girls by preparing the lists of girls continuing education and ensured that the girls receive all necessary materials. 

Now, after 16 years in exile and since the number of students is decreasing tremendously due to repatriation I will go back home to Southern Sudan. I hope to continue my education and I would like to acquire a Bachelor's Degree.